LIRR commuters show their faces

The claim that, “a picture is worth a thousand words” is true. Looking at any image, there is always a story to tell. How did that person or people end up where they are in the photograph?

In the photo story, “Faces of the Long Island Railroad,” there are definitely some stories to tell. Many times that a person takes public transportation, they see people who they will never encounter again in their life. In other situations, it becomes a familiar crowd.

So, who are those people? That was what Julio and Carlos were trying to convey.

More so with the photos than the words, they were able to illustrate a trend about the train passengers. Just looking at the story, it seems as if the crowd is extremely diverse, from every gender, ethnic group and age.

However, if a visitor to the blog scrolled through it quickly, they might not have noticed because of the size of the pictures. It would have been more effective to blow up the pictures and take up more space on the blog, as a large majority of the story being told comes from the image.

On that topic, it was interesting to see some of the stories that the duo were able to find out. Even though most were students, they each had different academic backgrounds, with differing opinions on the fare hike.

That being said, I think that telling their respective stories could have even been a bit better than focusing on the increased rate of traveling on the LIRR. A lot of the text in between images is attempting to give context about each of the subject’s feelings on the increase in the price of commuting, but that in a way could be a given.

Would anybody be happy about paying more money for anything?

It would have been interesting to see if the theater professor got on the train and worked on grading assignments or writing scripts. Did the students catch up on studying while they waited to get to Stony Brook or head for home?

Letting the pictures tell the story rather than in a way writing an article or blog post supplemented by images may have been more effective than it was. When the videographer, Brink, was featured, there is mention that, “the wind picked up.” It is a nice picture, but it does not necessarily show the wind, so the writing was a bit confusing.

Not that it was a bad story, it just raises questions that the viewer may want to see. That is the benefit of having a solid story idea.

A good story idea it was, as it raises curiosity. Just the whole concept of profiling strangers is engaging, as it is impossible to visualize a “stranger,” so one has to take a look at the story.

An interesting preface to the project was the duo’s social media use prior to putting together the photo story. As daily commuters themselves, Julio and Carlos have tweeted their experiences and difficulty with delays in the past.

Baring that in mind, it helped better understand that riders of the LIRR do not only have issues with paying fares and a pending increase, but that the service itself that they pay for is not perfect. In fact, it is far from it.

 

Faces of the Long Island Rail Road

Carlos Cadorniga also contributed to the story.

Long Island Rail Road commuters rode the rails through the winter with its harsh snowstorms and frigid temperatures. These commuters will face a cold reality when they shell out more money starting March 22 when fares are expected to increase. Taking into consideration the recent service disruptions and other factors such as what the revenue goes into, some said they do not believe fare increases are merited. 

ANIKA MARTIN

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Getting out early from an acting class, Anika Martin, a biochemistry major and Amityville resident, takes the 6:49 p.m. train to go home.  She said she does not think the fare should increase because of the excessive delays, she said, which “gets to be a bit annoying.” She said she thinks service should improve.

“We probably deserve a little compensation,” Martin said. “But I don’t think that’s going to happen.”

JUAN CANALES

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“It might not affect me in one shot,” said frequent commuter and business major Juan Canales when asked how the fare increase would impact him. “But it accumulates to be something else,” he continued, worried that the extra cash layout would definitely be a problem in the long run.

KARYN AMAIRA

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-Photo by Carlos Cadorniga

Karyn Amaira, a graduate student, will be lucky enough to escape the fare increase with alternative means of transportation.

“[The fare increase] will affect me a little bit, but not too much,” Amaira said when asked how she’d deal with the price increase. “I also have a car, which is a cheaper mode of transportation for me.”

KARA-LYNN VAENI

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Photo by Julio Avila

Boarding the same train, Kara-Lynn Vaeni, a theater arts professor at Stony Brook, normally took the 9:50 p.m. train, but with rehearsals for a play already done, she opts to commute home via the same 6:49 p.m. train. Though this train is earlier, the commute is longer compared to the later train. Vaeni is against the fare increase with the frequency of trains considered.

“It’ll affect me because it’ll eat more of my money,” Vaeni said. “But they are not changing the train schedule to be more convenient.” 

MICHAEL LEE

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The fare increase would have to be something he’ll deal with in the future, but ultimately decided it was “nothing significant.”

One student on the train, Michael Lee, resorted to the train for his commute after hazardous highways made driving a more dangerous practice. That being said, as a student who normally drives, he wasn’t entirely worried about the upcoming fare increase. It would have to be something he’ll deal with in the future, but ultimately decided it was “nothing significant.”

TOM BRINK

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Brink added that he does not understand why fares increase and would like to know what he’s paying for.

At the Huntington train station, Tom Brink, a videographer for an advertising agency, arrived on the 6:30 p.m. train out of Penn Station when the wind picked up momentum. He showed sympathy for the railroad despite the delays and service disruptions.

“For what it’s worth, this railroad actually does a pretty good job with all the demands that are put on it,” Brink said.

He said he would like the trains to have more cars coupled and the service to be improve. Brink added that he does not understand why fares increase and would like to know what he’s paying for, though fellow commuters he’s asked said they believe the extra money goes to the unions and pensions.

“It seems to be the trend,” Brink said.

SIARA DALTON

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Also at Huntington was freshman Siara Dalton, who takes the train every day. Paying depending on her schedule for the month–buying either monthly passes or daily tickets–she knew that this would definitely affect her in the future.

 LORENZO FOSCOLO

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“What’s the motivation?” Foscolo asked about the increase. “It takes two and a half hours to get back home.”

Lorenzo Foscolo got off the train from Stony Brook and was anxious to get on the connecting. He was surprised about the fare increase as he did not know about it. After the news broke to him, he was “not every happy.”

“What’s the motivation?” Foscolo asked about the increase. “It takes two and a half hours to get back home.”

YURIY SLASCHEV

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“I’m probably going to stop buying monthly passes,” Slaschev remarked. “It’s probably not even worth it to buy [them] anymore.”
Yuriy Slaschev, a freshman dropped off at New Hyde Park Station, has suffered from his own delays and even a train that simply didn’t show up. With frustrations at the sporadic service, he certainly wasn’t optimistic about a fare increase.

“I’m probably going to stop buying monthly passes,” Slaschev remarked. “It’s probably not even worth it to buy [them] anymore.”

STEPHEN CARDIELLO

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“There’ll definitely be drawbacks.” Cardiello said. “It’s definitely a sacrifice.”

Stephen Cardiello was waiting for the 8:44 p.m. train from Stony Brook on Wednesday night. What set him apart from anyone else is that he was not a Stony Brook student. Instead, he attends Suffolk Community College. He got a ride from his sister to the station to head home. He, like Foscolo, was surprised about the increases.

“There’ll definitely be drawbacks.” Cardiello said. “It’s definitely a sacrifice.”

As for alternate methods of transport, he said the county bus may be an option traveling between school and East Northport, where he lives. He said the bus “is a lot easier.”

RockYoFace brings music to the masses

By Ian Schafer, Jon Winkler and Bridget Downes

College life can take up a lot of time for many students. Classes, clubs, internships and jobs keep the students of Stony Brook University running around every week. Every now and then, the students have a chance to lay off some steam and express a side of themselves not seen in a classroom. On March 2, Stony Brook’s campus music showcase RockYoFace hosted an Open Mic Night in the University Cafe. Various students performed for a crowd looking for a night off from grades and grief.

The crowd at the University Cafe for the Open Mic Night. Photo Credit: Bridget Downes
The crowd at the University Cafe for the Open Mic Night. Photo Credit: Bridget Downes
Tweaking the soundboard  to make sure levels are set for the Open Mic Night. Photo Credit: Jon Winkler
Tweaking the soundboard to make sure levels are set for the Open Mic Night. Photo Credit: Jon Winkler
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Joe Schultz got his first didgeridoo from his father when he was 7. Photo Credit: Ian Schafer
Joe Schultz, a 20-year-old economics major, playing the Didgeridoo at the start of the Open Mic Night at 9 p.m. Schultz has also performed for the SBU Belly Dance Troupe and the TEDxSBU 2014 talk. Photo credit: Jon Winkler
Joe Schultz, a 20-year-old economics major, playing the Didgeridoo at the start of the Open Mic Night at 9 p.m. Schultz has also performed for the SBU Belly Dance Troupe and the TEDxSBU 2014 talk. Photo Credit: Jon Winkler
Chris Ehrich, a 19-year-old linguistics major, and Tony Gordon, a 20-year-old multidisciplinary studies major, perform as the duo Wonderfjul as the crowd captures their music. The duo covered two songs by Panic! At The Disco: "Always," and "The End of All Things." Photo Credit: Jon Winkler
Chris Ehrich, a 19-year-old linguistics major, and Tony Gordon, a 20-year-old multidisciplinary studies major, perform as the duo Wonderfjul as the crowd captures their music. The duo covered two songs by Panic! At The Disco: “Always,” and “The End of All Things.” Photo Credit: Jon Winkler
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Tony Gordon of Wonderfjul belts it. Photo Credit: Ian Schafer
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Amanda Jayne plays a solo set of original songs. Photo Credit: Bridget Downes
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Amanda Jayne’s Takamine acoustic. Photo Credit: Bridget Downes
Amanda Jayne, an 18-year-old theatre arts and history major, singing solo on acoustic guitar. Photo Credit: Ian Schafer
Amanda Jayne, an 18-year-old theatre arts and history major, singing solo on acoustic guitar. Photo Credit: Ian Schafer
Don Uccellini plays a solo set with his hollow-bodied Gretsch. PC: Bridget Downes
Don Uccellini plays a solo set with his hollow-bodied Gretsch.
Photo Credit: Bridget Downes
Don loves the bright lights.
Don loves the bright lights. Photo Credit: Ian Schafer
Nelson Pascuzzi, a 21-year-old mathematics/philosophy major, reciting a poem in relaxed fashion
Nelson Pascuzzi, a 21-year-old mathematics/philosophy major, reciting the poem “I am Shaun Gannon,” in a relaxed fashion. Photo Credit: Jon Winkler
Mary Garvey sent the crowd off with her ukulele  performance.
Mary Garvey sent the crowd off with her ukulele performance. Photo Credit: Ian Schafer
Nice hat.
Smiling for the paparazzi. Photo Credit: Ian Schafer
The crowd at Open Mic Night enjoying Nelson Pascuzzi's poetry
The crowd at Open Mic Night enjoying the atmosphere and music. Photo Credit: Jon Winkler

No stress at Winterfest!

By Emily Benson and Maddy Marcus

There’s a lot of clowning around done in college, so how about a carnival to go with it?

Stony Brook set up their first ever Winterfest last Saturday at the Student Union. This free event was set up to celebrate the winter season and combat student stress with carnival games, activities and more, according to an email sent out by Timothy Ecklund, Dean of Students prior to the event.

Though students crowded the Union on Saturday afternoon, not everyone attended, or even knew about Winterfest. Here are some of the highlights of the day that you may have missed:

9. Food
“Free Food.” Two of the greatest words every college student can hear. At Winterfest, students got a free lunch from a food truck parked outside the Union, all they had to do was swipe their ID Card.

“It’s a chance for students to kick back, blow off steam and let loose,” Howard Gunston, director of facilities for the Student Activities Center and the Union, said. Gunston was the man in charge of handing out the meal tickets and directing students to different activities.

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Howard Gunston, the director of facilities at the SAC and Union, gave students an itinerary of the events at Winterfest. His job was to supervise the events of the day and promote as much as he could to get students involved/ Photo credit: Emily Benson
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Students lined up at the food truck outside the front of the Union to turn in their meal tickets for food. Choices included pulled pork sandwiches, grilled chicken sandwiches, veggie burgers and hot dogs. All meals included a drink and chips/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus

8. Ice Skating
What better way to celebrate the winter than with ice skating? Outside in the parking lot behind the Union, a small, portable ice rink was set up. Students could pick out ice skates in their size and try out the rink. The rink was made of white plastic sheets that were sprayed with a thin ice coating, which made things easier for those who didn’t know how to skate, Valentine Edwards, a biochemistry major who tried out the ice rink, said.

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The “ice” was supplied by Great Neck Games and Productions. The plastic pieces stuck together like puzzle pieces and a plastic, white picket fence surrounded the area in the parking lot/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus
Valentine Edwards and friends try out the ice rink at Winterfest/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus
Valentine Edwards (second from left) and friends try out the ice rink at Winterfest/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus

7. Music
WUSB, the university’s radio station, supplied the music for Winterfest. For the first half of the event, the station was playing carnival themed music then brought in a DJ who played more dance-like music for the remaining time. WUSB was giving out hot chocolate, popcorn and other goodies in their office on the second floor of the Union.

WUSB DJ spun records and played dance music during the last half of Winterest/Photo credit Maddy Marcus
WUSB DJ spun records and played dance music during the last half of Winterest/Photo credit Maddy Marcus

6. Games
Carnival games could be found in the Union front lobby and side dining area. Games ranged from shooting baskets to throwing darts, and even if you didn’t win, every game was free of charge. The carnival games, prizes and ice skating rink was all provided by Great Neck Games and Productions, an event rental and production company

Victoria Santiago, the event planner for Great Neck Games, said Stony Brook contacted them about a month ago to plan for Winterfest.

“I love this kind of stuff,” Santiago said on planning Winterfest. “I’m a people person, and I love talking to students and interacting with the attendants.”

Students playing a round of dart toss at one of the event booths/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus
Students playing a round of dart toss at one of the event booths/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus

5. Prizes
In true carnival game fashion, winning these deceitful games are harder than one would think, but still not impossible. In you won a game, you were given a ticket that you could hold on to until you wanted to claim your winnings at the prize booth, a table filled with red, blue and green stuffed frogs, monkeys and flowers.

Stony Brook ordered 500 stuffed prizes, estimating an attendance around that number. even with an hour left in the event, prizes began to run dry, leaving only around ten undesired fuzzy pink, yellow and green caterpillars to be chosen from.

Prizes hung across the top of every game booth/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus
Prizes hung across the top of every game booth/Photo credit: Maddy Marcus
Teddy (Emily)
More prizes on the top of the event booths/Photo credit: Emily Benson

4. Photobooth
In the Union ballroom students could find massages, arts and crafts tables and a Photo Booth. The photo booth had dark navy background, and purple and white snowflakes splattered on it, as well as a box of goofy props, like feather boas, hats and huge glasses, to use in the photo taking fun.

Students could choose from a variety of silly costumes and line up with friends to get their picture taken Polaroid style/Photo by: Maddy Marcus
Students could choose from a variety of silly costumes and line up with friends to get their picture taken Polaroid style/Photo by: Maddy Marcus

3. Crafts
The Stony Brook Craft Center set up multiple craft tables in the Union Ballroom where students gathered with their friends to make marshmallow characters, bookmarks, buttons, and serenity candles.

Rima Madan and Nick Spiezio said they were attracted to the craft area because they saw a table full of marshmallows and a sign with Olaf, from the Disney movie, Frozen, asking students if they wanted to build a snow man.

Rima Madan and Nick Spiezios pose with one of their marshmallow snowmen made at one of the craft center's tables.
Rima Madan (left) and Nick Spiezio (right) pose with one of their marshmallow snowmen made at one of the craft center’s tables/Photo credit: Emily Benson

2. Massages
Tucked away in the side of the Union ballroom, a row of 9 massage chairs stood in a row, each with a professional masseuse by its side waiting to help students relieve some of that crazy, midterm stress. Each masseuse started with a shoulder rub, lower and upper back massage, and finished off with a relaxing hand massage.

“The massages were really nice,” Spiezio said. He also said he recommends them to anyone who came to Winterfest.

Masseuuuuse (Emily)
The row of massage chairs set up in the Union ballroom/Photo credit: Emily Benson
ugh (Emily)
A student receiving a back massage far from the hustle and bustle of the craft side/Photo credit: Emily Benson

1. FUN!
Overall, Winterfest was fun! It was an event planned to let students relax in the midst of a busy start to the semester and to help them ease their cabin fever brought on by the snow, according to Gunston. About 500 students showed up to Winterfest, and some didn’t even plan on coming and were caught up in the wave just by walking through the Union.

“I just got the email this morning,” Rima Madan said.

Gunston said depending on the popularity of Winterfest, the university may do something like it again next year. And by the looks of the event, it was quite a hit.

“It’s a good idea,” Valentine Edwards said. “I hope that Stony Brook can do a lot more events like this.”

Toni (left) and Nicole (right) show off the prizes they won. "It's a cool, interactice thing for kids to do on campus on a Saturday," Nicole said/Photo credit: Emily Benson
Toni (left) and Nicole (right) show off the prizes they won. “It’s a cool, interactice thing for kids to do on campus on a Saturday,” Nicole said/Photo credit: Emily Benson

SBU Frigid Fashion

By Kayla Shults and Abby Del Vecchio

March has begun, but the cold weather doesn’t look like it is going away anytime soon.  With a campus as large as Stony Brook University, and these brutal temperatures and wind chills, students have to bundle up in order to keep warm — even if it means sacrificing their fashion sense.

In order to keep warm during these brutal temperatures, 20-year-old biology student, Emily Fidilio says, "Infinity scarves are a must in this weather.  Also, big cozy stuff, like oversized sweaters, to keep warm."
In order to keep warm during these brutal temperatures, 20-year-old biology student, Emily Fidilio says, “Infinity scarves are a must in this weather. Also, big cozy stuff, like oversized sweaters, to keep warm.”
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“Look at my boots,” said Fidilio. “They’re so dirty from the snow!”
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“I wear cardigans and sometimes argyle sweaters to keep me warm,” said 21-year-old business major Erik Hoerner.
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“When temperatures dip below 30 and it’s so windy I would rather be warm than fashionable,” said Hoerner.
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“This pea coat keeps me warm,” said Hoerner. “And it’s fashionable, I mean look at it!”
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Holly Vickers works for the non-profit organization, Bottom Line, which aims to help disadvantaged students, “get into college, graduate from college and go far in life.”
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The 26-year-old was at Stony Brook University to meet with some students involved with her program. About her winter fashion, she said, “I don’t own any pants so I wear dresses all year. If it’s really cold I’ll wear up to three pairs of fleece or regular tights. Summer and winter clothes are the same for me, just with or without the tights.”
Lauren
Lauren Reinertsen is a 21-year-old member of the Stony Brook Rugby squad. Her fashion is something she’s proud of, even if some people don’t like it as much as she does. “This is an over sized coat because it’s a men’s jacket,” said Reinertsen. “Most people laugh at it so I’m glad someone appreciates it!”
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The sociology major credits her fashion skills to America’s Next Top Model and its host, Tyra Banks. “Everything I know about modelling I learned from Tyra,” said Reinertsen.
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“Sweaters, leggings, mittens and scarves are the most important things to wear,” said Yelizaveta Lysakoea, a 19-year-old psychology major. “I always have coffee because it’s so cold.”
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24-year-old sociology major and biology minor Oscar Icochea says he doesn’t let the cold weather affect his fashion. “I just make it work,” he said. “I try to buy fashionable winter clothes.”
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Icochea’s motto when it comes to his fashion sense? “You gotta be a baller on a budget.”

No matter how cold it may be, it looks like the people at Stony Brook always know how to stay fashionable.  Even though it doesn’t look like the snow is melting away anytime soon, let’s hope March will bring slightly warmer temperatures so Seawolves can break out this spring’s hottest trends, whatever they may be.

No sleep for the studious

By Jimin Kim and Janelle Clausen

College studies are not for the faint of heart.

For some Stony Brook University students, the end of February and the start of March means midterms week or better yet, hell week. Students are busy preparing for their first major test of the semester. Some are studying alone, while others are teaming up with friends. Although their majors may vary, one goal unites them–doing well on their exams.

These studying students dot the campus landscape. They’re anchored down in dorms, the campus library and lounges, often from early morning into the depths of night with Starbucks coffee beside them.

An old team and a new trade

First year Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine graduate students, Rebecca Geller, 22, Nabamita Kanjilal, 22, and Jimmy Shak, 23, used a large digital touch screen for the first time at the back of the campus library’s North Reading Room to quiz each other. The night before, they reviewed in Geller’s house. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 28, 2015).
Unlike their undergraduate counterparts, their classes are not for credit and fall under a checklist of courses they must complete before specializing in their dental studies. When asked how much they normally studied, they replied, “all day,” in unison. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 28, 2015).
Geller took off her gray UGG boots and sat Indian style to stay comfortable while checking her answer in the review packet. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 28, 2015).

Going the extra mile

Na Li, a 19-year-old sophomore chemistry major, studied Friday morning in the library’s Commuter Lounge to prepare for her calculus midterm as her boyfriend, Ian Atkinson, gave her emotional support. Atkinson, 21, who graduated from Suffolk County Community College as a fitness specialist, drives Li to SBU from her home in Bohemia once a week and spends time with her on campus. “When she’s stressed, I’m usually there to take her stress out on,” said Atkinson. “She can yell at me every once in a while to get some stress out.” Photo by Janelle Clausen (Feb. 27, 2015).

United in a pursuit of excellence

Andrew Ki, a 22-year-old senior applied math and statistics (AMS) and economics double major, and Martin DeGuzman, a 25-year-old AMS senior, are a well-oiled studying machine. Although there are scores of other students in their department they could work with, they relate to one another’s desire to excel in their class. “It’s a world of difference when you have a person who’s just as committed as you are to your academics when you’re preparing for tests,” said Ki, sitting in the library’s Central Reading Room. Photo by Janelle Clausen (Feb. 27, 2015).
Ever since they began studying together last summer, they have noticed significant improvement in their grades. This is their sixth class together and they bring out the best student in each other. “You have an extra brain, an extra set of eyes and it’s a different perspective,” DeGuzman said. Photo by Janelle Clausen (Feb. 27, 2015).

The girl with the yellow scarf

Morgan DiCarlo, 20, a junior civil engineering major tackling 20 credits and several hours of work in the library, hopes to ace her Design of Structures and Geotechnical Engineering exams. (according to AP Style, no quotes or italics for course titles) This could boost her grade to a 3.5 GPA, which could lead to a summer internship with the Army Corps of Engineers so she can start a career in water sanitation. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 27, 2015).
Morgan DiCarlo, 20, a junior civil engineering major tackling 20 credits and several hours of work in the library, hopes to ace her Design of Structures and Geotechnical Engineering exams. This could boost her grade to a 3.5 GPA, which could lead to a summer internship with the Army Corps of Engineers so she can start a career in water sanitation. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 27, 2015).

Can’t be too quiet to study

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For 22-year-old Gabriela Cardoso, left, who’s a senior biology major, the Student Union lounge is a safe haven to study with her friends, Arely Sosa, a 21-year-old health science junior, and Tayisha St Vil, a 21-year-old women’s studies senior. Photo by Janelle Clausen (Feb. 28, 2015).
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University sports memorabilia line the walls of the lounge as faint pop songs from the campus Starbucks next door crept into the room. The team prefers studying in a casual atmosphere than in a dead silent library. Saturdays are usually when they go out to unwind, but, not that night. “The social, moral support of seeing your friends studying encourages you to study as well and not be distracted,” St Vil said. “If any of us said we were going to go party, I would probably advise you not to.” Photo by Janelle Clausen (Feb. 28, 2015).

An exam to end uncertainty

Narthana Parathalingam, an 18-year old freshman biology major, clicked away on her laptop in the campus Starbucks to cram for her calculus midterm. “It’s hard to catch up on all of the things you missed,” said Parathalingam. “I missed one day and I have to catch up on all of the materials.” Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 28, 2015).
When it came to her calculus class, she wasn’t too sure of where her grades stood. “Homework-wise, I’m doing well,” she said. “But, I have to wait and see until I take that test.” Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 28, 2015).
When it came to her calculus class, she wasn’t too sure of where her grades stand. “Homework-wise, I’m doing well,” she said. “But, I have to wait and see until I take this test.” Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 28, 2015).
Although she’s unsure of her plans after college, she hopes dedication to her studies will guide her towards a bright future. “I want to get most of my grades, my GPA up and then, figure out what I can do,” she said. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 28, 2015).

Studious Seawolves

At 1:38 a.m. on Feb. 27, freshman government major, Vanessa Cordova, and sophomore economics major, Filipe Espatia, prepared for major upcoming exams. The couple highlighted notes and helped each other study. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 27, 2015).

For assignment two, my partner and I will photograph Stony Brook University students studying for midterms, which are taking place this week and next week. In doing this photo story, we’ll capture each student’s approach to studying and handling stress.

We will photograph students during the day and at night. The locations will include the Melville library, the Commuter Lounge in the library and in the Student Activities Center, the Starbucks on campus and the upstairs dining area of the Student Union.

In doing this photo story, my partner and I will collect backstories of each student, including how they feel about their upcoming exams, what their methods are for managing stress and the challenges of their major.

The Commuter Lounge of the Melville Library is a go-to location for many students who study late into the night. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 27, 2015).

The photos will portray two different atmospheres during study week. The pictures captured during the day may depict a more chaotic scene where students are in a rush to study, eat, as well as make it to their next class. The photos taken in the evening might illustrate students who are fighting exhaustion to study and succeed on their midterms.

The photographs will also portray a diverse group of students who are of different races, ages and fields of study.

This photo taken in the afternoon, shows how the library hallway is a popular studying location for students. Photo by Jimin Kim (Feb. 24, 2015).

In taking this approach, the story may reveal if being a graduate student is more demanding than being an undergraduate or if a foreign exchange student has a more difficult time preparing for tests due to the language barrier.

Therefore, the photo story will provide an in-depth and gritty portrayal of the challenging life of college students.

Faces of the Long Island Railroad

The Long Island Railroad transports thousands of commuters each day. No two people are the same with each person commuting to different destinations for different reasons.

This project, consisting of pictures and quotes from commuters, would capture the essence and commutes of various people. Questions to ask would be “where are you going,” “which train are you taking,” “how often do you ride the LIRR,” and other various questions. If there is a severe delay, emotions and potential tensions flying high would make for great content.

Taking pictures at a station would not be much of an issue as a few projects for JRN 215 were shot on location at Huntington and Floral Park with no resistance from anyone. As for the taking pictures on the train, permission may be needed and verification of who to contact on the Long Island Railroad for this permission will be looked into.

Above all,  this would be like “Humans of New York,” but centered around the Long Island Railroad and those who rely on it each day.

Stony Brook baseball players look to earn another chance while seeking success as a team

When any college sports team takes the field, it is not about a group of athletes stepping onto a playing field to try to win. Instead, those young adults are students as well.

Some student-athletes have given up more than just their free time to join their respective teams.

The Stony Brook Seawolves have three alum who currently hold a roster spot on a Major League Baseball team. Joe Nathan, Tom Koehler and Nick Tropeano all put on a baseball jersey in front of thousands of people every day and night.

Kevin Krause was picked in the MLB Draft last season after playing in front of nearly nobody at Joe Nathan Field. (NINA LIN/ THE STATESMAN)
Kevin Krause was picked in the MLB Draft last season after playing in front of nearly nobody at Joe Nathan Field. (NINA LIN/ THE STATESMAN)

On this season’s Seawolves squad, there are players who gave up that chance in order to pursue an education and enhance their abilities at the same time.

In fact, Johnny Caputo, who is a junior infielder from Ontario, was drafted in the 12th round of the 2012 MLB Draft. That is a relatively high selection, as there are 40 rounds, full of college and high school players. Caputo passed on the dream to come to Stony Brook.

The same goes for left-handed pitcher Daniel Zamora, a sophomore. He went in the 27th round, but also chose to pursue his studies while looking to enhance his stock as a prospect in the college game.

When the Seawolves take on NYIT at their own Joe Nathan Field on Tuesday at 3 p.m., each of these stories will take the field, looking to pave their paths to success as a team. As individuals, they push to achieve their professional dreams of playing in front of thousands, even though the game Tuesday may only have a handful of fans in the crowd.

Then, there are those like left-handed pitcher Tyler Honahan who are coming into their own while donning their Seawolves attire. The youngster has taken the America East Conference by storm since he came to Long Island, becoming a draft prospect himself to one day join the ranks of the professionals.

So, shooting photographs of this otherwise meaningless baseball game will not be about documenting one player throwing a ball and another one hitting it. Instead, it will show where a bunch of what still are kids are working everyday towards achieving their goals. Whether that is fighting to earn another chance, or clawing for a first shot, the Seawolves are made up of an interesting groups of individuals in interesting situations.

When looking at Caputo in the batter’s box, with only a couple of diehard fans distantly in the background, imagine what could have been. A couple could be a sold-out crowd.

As Zamora and company hurl pitches off the mound with grimaces on their faces, does that only show the strain of throwing that one pitch, or a hard-fought journey to achieve a dream?

For Head Coach Matt Senk, he has seen it all. He was with this team when they were in NCAA’s Division III with no scholarships on a field fitting for a high school squad. Now, he huddles his team up on a recently-completed multi-million dollar project. That is more than the ordinary baseball coach has seen.

Again, this game is more than just watching to see who scored more runs.
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ORIGINAL PITCH- CHANGED TO BASEBALL

One would think that the spring sports season would be accompanied by heat and sunshine. Instead, as Stony Brook’s men’s lacrosse team continues their season, they still contend with a chilly, snow-dwarfed Kenneth P. Lavalle Stadium.

Ironically enough, it is of the utmost importance for the Seawolves to warm up, as America East Conference play starts just two weeks following their contest against the Stags.

Junior Challen Rogers looks to lead the Seawolves to victory. (NINA LIN/ THE STATESMAN)
Junior Challen Rogers looks to lead the Seawolves to victory. (NINA LIN/ THE STATESMAN)

Although the stands do not fill up quite as quickly for a game of lacrosse compared to a basketball match up in the new Island Federal Credit Union Arena, there are just as many if not more opportunities for a story.

The yellow rubber ball, if not many of them, are bound to fly off of an erroneous shot or pass into the mounds of snow coating the sidelines and most of the seating areas.

What better way to show a reader that a spring sport is being played in the winter than by snapping a shot of a ball lodged in the snow?

In fact, the Seawolves were supposed to take on defending National Champion today, Feb. 22, but the team from North Carolina was not able to flight out because of winter weather.

Furthermore, every aspect of a game can be told through a camera lens. Catching a coach with their hands in the air or on their heads shows more than just a physical action. As they say, “a picture is worth a thousand words,” and someone taking a look at a lacrosse photo story could tell how the coach is feeling about the game by looking at one image.

In a way, a camera could capture the action itself better than words.

Even for avid lacrosse fans, it is hard to envision exactly what this refers to. Was Schultz right by the goalie, or was he merely off balance further away? A picture is able to answer this, and contribute to tell the story of a lacrosse game.

Michael Evans, a lacrosse player for Team USA, although he did not mean it that way, once summed up sports photography best.

“It’s all about the little things.”