Worries of Waist Training

It seems new trends come left and right, whether it being the latest hairstyle, blue being the new black, or the never-ending latest diet fad.

A new fad among some women to hit the scene is tight lacing, or better known as waist training. This is the practice of wearing a tightly laced corset to slim your mid-drift.

There are various reasons why women would put their bodies into such extremes. One in particular is to hopefully lose inches off of their waist. While other popular goals is to maintain an hourglass shape or to help lose post pregnancy weight.

With this, one would be reshaping their ribcage to the desired silhouette.

This is new but not so. Corsets were first worn by male and female Minoans of Crete, though it did not become popular until the 16th century France and remained a fashionable dress until the French Revolution. Though, wearing a corset during these times were for different reasons.

Women would wear them to push up their breasts so they would peek over the corset, creating a bustier look, as well as a less rigid bodice.

As time passed, style had evolved. Until the 1840’s were the desire for a tighter silhouette was desired. It wasn’t until the late years of the Victorian era that medical reports and rumors claimed that tight lacing was fatally detrimental to health.

Then again, in the late 1900s the small corseted waist was no longer fashionable. That is until now, in the new millennium, the trend has been reintroduced.

Waist training today works as so, first one is recommended to do research. Find out exactly what goal they are trying to achieve and the severity they are willing to go.

Then there is finding out the corset preference. There are a few, such as, brocade, cotton, leather and satin. What they all do have in common is that they are steel boned, helping to keep a maintained shape in the corset.

Tiffani, a team member and video blogger for the Orchard Corset Blog, says that there is no one answer when you will see results. Numerous factors contribute to results. It all depends on your commitment. How many hours and days you wear the corset, and if you are incorporating diet and exercise.

It is advised that to have proper results you must incorporate all of this.

With popular celebrities such as the Kardashian clan and Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi, who swear by this based on their social media updates, their adoring fans are easy to follow.

Jessica Alba, another believer of waist training, revealed to Net-A-Porter magazine that she “wore a double corset day and night for months,” to help rid her post pregnancy weight.

Now whether this works or not, the most important question to ask is, is it safe?

Dr. Mary Jane Minkin, a clinical professor of OBGYN at Yale School of Medicine, says once you take the garment off, your body will return to its usual shape. It’s also uncomfortable, restricts your movements, and if you wear it really tight, it can even make it difficult to breathe and theoretically could cause rib damage. There are plenty other statistics about this but I am not going to list them all just yet.

This also plays into a psychological sense. Meaning, using the media to convince women they should portray a certain body image.

Psychologist Marci Lobel this can help produce eating disorders in women. Some studies, such as “The Thin Ideal,” show that girls in the second grade, who see their moms and women in the media striving for this “perfect body,” begin to develop body image issues at a younger age. Claiming that they hate their bodies, want to lose weight and are already on a diet.

 It seems that at the end of the day there is going to only be two things to get your body into a slimmer shape, diet and exercise, or just be happy with who you are.

The Use of Data Journalism

As a journalist, one can always be looking for new ways to avoid being too wordy. One crossroad in particular is writing a data journalism story and incorporating all of the data and statistics needed.

A writer can easily lose their reader and cause them to become side tracked to what exactly they’re talking about. For instance, writing a story, or videography discussing the rise of zombie houses or the rate of domestic violence arrests amongst NFL players. There is going to be a lot of information and numbers.

Luckily, a writer can incorporate graphs, or even videos, to their stories.

Courtesy of USA Today NFL Player Arrests Database
Courtesy of USA Today NFL Player Arrests Database

Here, as you can see, is a graph showing the rates of NFL related arrests. Instead of writing out all of the numbers and names of the specific arrests, a detailed graph can be used instead. This also adds a nice visual to the piece as well. Now that you can save time on explaining step by step each piece of data, you can discuss other important things instead.

Another example is Newsday’s lifecycle of a zombie house. Rather than going through a written step by step explanation of the procedure that goes into the maintenance and problems of a zombie house, they instead inserted a slide show. This also makes the reader interact with the story as well.

Another thing Newsday had, which was different for me to see, was how you can type in a specific zip code and get the exact number of zombie houses in that particular area.

I find what both news organizations did were compelling to their stories. They left less confusion, numbers, statistics, etc. After awhile when you’re only reading a story through text it can become boring and tedious. Instead, I enjoyed the use of graphs, videos, and interactive slideshows to keep the story interesting, and it held my attention the entire time.

Definitely something to know for future reference.

Addicted to Social Media

I have always been social media savvy. My first encounter was when I was 12-years-old and I created a Meetspot, which feels like centuries ago at this point.

At around the age of 13 is when I started living off of Myspace. Constantly posting updates of my dramatic teenage life, and consistent fights over who was in my top eight.

As time progressed Myspace died and I moved onto FaceBook, as did everyone else. Again, posting my everyday life because I found it to be necessary, for whatever reason.

Photo Credit: Crafttruck.com
Photo Credit: Crafttruck.com

It wasn’t until a couple years ago did social media play an actual importance to my life. When I first created a Facebook and Instagram account they were both just in their beginning stages.

Now I use them for networking, receiving news and just keeping up to date with recent trends.

One social media site I wasn’t to fond of was Twitter. That was until my journalism 301 professor suggested to create one and stressed the importance to do so. He went on and on about how crucial it will be for our future jobs and careers.

Photo Credit: Huffingtonpost.com
Photo Credit: Huffingtonpost.com

So naturally I created one. Never used it.

Now, in my current semester, I have finally put Twitter to use. In my journalism 320 class, it was required to use the social site. Other than the class assignments, I still never use it.

Nothing personal against Twitter but I just prefer Facebook and Instagram. Here and there I will ‘Tweet’, still not as often as others. I still have more followers on Instagram than I do Twitter, but I still follow Twitter accounts that I find interesting, though I usually do not check.

All in all I can say throughout this class it has boosted my social media skills in a sense. I’ve never used social media to report a story, so that is something new to add to my list. Also I have never written a blog post before, which I think is the most important skill I have learned so far, and will continue to use and advance.

Freedom from Addiction

Heather Manson, a 20-year-old Brooklyn native, sees freedom in a different way than others. At the age of 13, Manson started her abuse of drugs.

Growing up in a household of addiction Manson feels that she was trapped in a lifestyle she would eventually fall into. Stating that in the area of Brooklyn she lived in, being on drugs seemed to be more of a norm. After years of struggling with this vicious life cycle her family went through, she decided there was more to life.

With the final decision to move away to Florida, she was able to free her self from the demons she lived with.

Podcast Listening

After listening to Invisibilia and New Tech City, I’ve realized that these podcasts both share some similarities.

In both podcasts they take a play on natural sound. For example, on Invisibilia, Alix and Lulu talked about a man who was blind and how when he was younger he would make this clicking sound in school so he would know where he was. At the same time they played the clicking sound underneath the track to give the viewers an understanding of what this sound was.

Photograph by: Daniel Horowitz for NPR
Photograph by: Daniel Horowitz for NPR

While on New Tech City they had a story about braille becoming obsolete, and within the beginning of the story you heard the natural sound of people talking amongst themselves at a school for the blind.

Another similarity the two had was their play on music. Depending on the theme of the story, whether it being sad or enlightening, is what type of background music they would have playing. In both stories it would start off with a more lower tone as people would talk about the hard times they had being blind. Then ending with a more upbeat tone towards the end, because the story would have a happy turn around.

Photo courtesy of The Texas School for the Blind.
Photo courtesy of The Texas School for the Blind.

Something that New Tech City did with their story that I liked was that they interacted with their listeners. The story discussed about how smart phones have a settings feature for the blind. So they asked for those with smartphones to take out their phones and go to the settings menu to see this feature if they haven’t before.

There wasn’t much that I did not like. I think the only thing I would’ve preferred was for them not to cut back and forth so much. At one point it was a bit confusing as to who was speaking. Other than that I enjoyed the style the podcasts used.

Destined for journalism

     I wasn’t always sure what I wanted to do with my life. Since I was five-years-old I always imagined myself being a marine biologist. I was amazed with the ocean and what lived inside of it.

     As I got older and started college I felt myself at a crossroad. I no longer knew if this is what I wanted for myself anymore.

My first two years of college was spent at Kingsborough Community College in Brooklyn. I chose to stay as a liberal arts major, and dapple around until I knew what I definitely wanted.

It wasn’t until I took a business of communications class and I’ll never forget what my professor said, “chase your bliss.” For days I had this quote in my head and thought what is it I love most? That’s when it hit me, I love TV and always wanted to be a reporter, but more for entertainment.

Red carpets, golden globes, celebrities and fashion is what I love. I love reading about it, talking about it, researching etc.

As my two years approached I knew I had to look into a four year school to begin my major. First I looked into Miami university, but 58,000 dollars a year was out of my price range.

I’ve heard of Stony Brook numerous times before. My older brother -six years older- wanted to go here and his friends went too. So the name always stuck in the back of my head since I was younger, and I knew it was an excellent school.

After I applied I was pretty much banking on stony Brook and Brooklyn College as my back up. Both schools have great broadcast departments, so I wouldn’t be upset with either. Though going away to Stony Brook was at the top.

I nearly had a panic attack when I received my acceptance letter. As I said before my brother applied, but he was rejected and he was always the book worm, so I was stunned. I sometimes still can’t believe I am here.

I realize now I made the right choice in coming here. I am so thankful that two years later I am here doing exactly what I want to do with the rest of my life.

Taandava Performance Review

This past Saturday was the Jana Seva show, a classical Indian dance that was performed by the SBU Taandava Club. It was said the show was a hit, but what exactly was the process the club had to go through before the performance?

Reporters Diana Lopez and Stephen Infantolino went and got some answers, and executed the task phenomenally.

Throughout their story, everything was explained in full detail, which is important since there were plenty of terms not everyone would know right away, such as why each performer wears certain accessories or why they draw specific details on their bodies. As well as some facts about India.

The pictures were beautiful and attractive to the eye. Crisp, clear and colorful, they were amazing and the first thing that stuck out to me, which is a good tactic to pull in a reader instantly.

Different angles and close ups gave the reader a good idea of what the performers wear, and what they go through to prepare. Also the photo captions gave full detail as to what was going on within each picture.

The store has an easy flow, so a reader would not get lost or confused throughout the story.

The only change I would suggest is to have added pictures of the dancers during the performance, some moving, in action shots. Possibly a couple pictures of the audience and their reactions to the performance.

Other than those additions, I think the story was overall really good. Hopefully, from Lopez’s and Infantolino’s reporting, it will attract more attendees to future shows.

Fun and cheap eats around Stony Brook

Ever wonder what was in the backyard of Stony Brook University?

The Stony Brook and East Setauket area have a variety of eateries that are close to campus and affordable for students. If you feel like you are getting sick of campus food, or the usual Panera Bread and McDonald’s, then here are a couple of places to try.

Curry Club:

Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta

10 Woods Corner Rd, East Setauket, NY 11733

For those who have an intense Indian food craving, Curry Club offers traditional Indian dishes. Menu items that include a range of samosas to the popular chicken masala.

Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
Vegetable Samosas, crisp patties filled with potatoes, peas and Indian spices, for $3.99. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
Mango lassi is a traditional Indian yogurt drink. The Curry Club offers different flavors of lassi for under $3.  Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
Mango lassi is a traditional Indian yogurt drink. The Curry Club offers different flavors of lassi for under $3.
Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta

Appetizers are quite largely portioned and prices range from $4-$12. The restaurant offers traditional Indian drinks, like Indian beer, wine and lassi. Dessert is also all under $4.99, with items including gajar halva and kheer, to name a few.

The restaurant is student friendly and offers a 10% discount to anyone with a Stony Brook University ID.

Chef Jimmy (right) and customer Scott Zamek pose for a photo in the Velvet Lounge. The lounge attached to  the side of  The Curry Club.
Chef Jimmy, above, said that the best time to come to The Curry Club is during the buffet hours, 12-3 p.m. The buffet is $11 on the weekdays and $14 on the weekends for all you can eat. Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

Crazy Beans:

Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

97 Main St Ste A, Stony Brook, NY 11790

Known for having over 30 flavors of coffee, Crazy Beans is a great place to go for those early breakfast cravings or just to catch up over brunch.

Crazy Beans chicken salad of the day. Offered for $7.95, with the option of in a wrap or on bread. Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Crazy Beans chicken salad of the day. Offered for $7.95, with the option of in a wrap or on bread. Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

The menu offers breakfast and lunch all day long. Popular items includes Crazy Beans chicken and waffles, breakfast quesadillas, ranch pesto wrap and their chicken salad wraps, which change weekly. The kitchen only uses organic cage-free items and are will make any adjustments to meals in order to accommodate customers.

Katherine Jaeger (above) frequently eats at Crazy Beans. She likes the corky atmosphere and Crazy Beans as a local business in the area.  Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Katherine Jaeger (above) frequently eats at Crazy Beans. She likes the corny atmosphere and supports the cafe as a local business in the area.
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

The cafe draws in a lot of students who come in during their breaks from class, according the staff.

Any latte can be made hot or iced and are about $5. The coffee comes from Barrie House and the espresso comes from Stone Street.  Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Any latte can be made hot or iced and are about $5. The coffee comes from Barrie House and the espresso comes from Stone Street.
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

The restaurant is also ideal for those who are focusing on having a healthy and balanced diet. Offering egg white omelettes, fruit and yogurt, salads, and gluten free platters, such as pancakes and waffles.

"Crazy Sauce" is featured on some of the dishes at Crazy Beans. It is a secret sauce that only one cook knows how to make.  Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
“Crazy Sauce” is featured on some of the dishes at Crazy Beans. It is a secret sauce, with a little kick, that only one cook knows the recipe for.
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

As of now there are no student discounts, but the idea is currently in the works. The menu will also soon be changing to add new items and eliminate some, however the student-friendly prices will remain about the same.

Robinson’s Tea Room:

Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

97 Main St, Stony Brook, NY 11790

The 16-year-old family owned tea house has a list of over 40 different tea options. A full British afternoon tea service is offered with reservations, for those who enjoy high British tea. With this customers can enjoy as much tea and coffee, iced or hot, along with a three-tier of scones, finger sandwiches and desserts.

Homemade scones available to stay or for the student on the go. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
Homemade scones available to stay or for the student on the go. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta

All menu items are family recipes, from the chili to the scones, which ingredients are kept secret.

Students are not an unlikely face, Stony Brook medical students are some of their usual customers.

DSC_2202
Singer, and wife to the late John Lennon, Yoko Ono. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta

A wall of tea cups and plates are held in honor of those celebrities that have once visited the tea room.

A small teapot, 6 cups worth, of Apricot Strawberry Kiwi tea. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
A small teapot, 6 cups worth, of Apricot Strawberry Kiwi tea. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
Friends Salime Vasquez, Sofia Torres and Jessica Garden come to Robinson's Tea Room because they love tea patries. Torres said that she started coming to Robinson's because she heard on a news show that it is the best place for tea on Long Island.  Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Friends Salime Vasquez, Sofia Torres and Jessica Garden come to Robinson’s Tea Room because they love tea parties. Torres said that she started coming to Robinson’s because she heard on a news show that it is the best place for tea on Long Island.
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

Though there are no student discounts, menu items are fairly affordable, with tea pots starting at $3.95 and sweet breakfast treats starting at $2.50.

Latitude 121:

Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

121 Main St, Stony Brook, NY 11790

This restaurant offers breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert. Latitude 121 has two different sections, the parlor side and dining section. The bistro menu, offered in the parlor, is affordable for college students and also displays Gifford’s world-famous ice cream.

Aidan Swift, 16-year-old employee, said that his favorite flavors of Gifford's ice cream are the campfire smores and muddy boots.  Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Aidan Swift, 16-year-old employee, said that his favorite flavors of Gifford’s ice cream are the campfire s’mores and muddy boots.
Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

New to the menu is their alcoholic dessert drinks, which also can be made virgin for those who are not of legal drinking age.

Marshmallow Fondue Martini and a Night owl Milkshake. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta
Marshmallow Fondue Martini and a Night owl Milkshake. Photo Credit: Nicole Falletta

On Fridays and Saturdays there is live music, and Monday through Friday happy hour runs from 3-7, offering half-priced appetizers and drinks.

Popular menu items range from their Montauk grilled cheese, to their chocolate chip bread pudding, that was once only offered as a special. The dessert was in such high demand that the restaurant added it to their everyday menu.

Bistro Burger, made with U.S.D.A ground beef for $12. Photo Credit: Krysten Massa
Bistro Burger, made with U.S.D.A ground beef for $12. Photo Credit: Krysten Massa

As of now there are no student discounts, but it is currently under high consideration.

There are many more unique and college-friendly eateries in the area. Use this list to help get you started broadening your everyday dining choices.

Stony Brook Listicle: The Places You Didn’t Know

Attending Stony Brook for some, like myself, can be like the old “small fish, big pond” saying. Students may be stuck hanging out on campus because they do not know what is exactly around them, besides the typical bars in Port Jefferson.

Some students are coming from one extreme to another, whether it being previously living in a large city, a different state or country, to a quiet suburban neighborhood. For Stony Brook University this isn’t uncommon.

If one is not familiar with the area, they may be completely unaware of what Stony Brook has to offer, rather than it’s 1,364 acre campus.

Stony Brook University is located right outside of Stony Brook Village, which is nothing but a skip away. Though, as close as it is it seems there are hidden ventures that some may not know about.

Photo Credit: www.thelenardteam.com
Photo Credit: http://www.thelenardteam.com

From personal experience I had not a single clue of where I was living. All I knew was that I lived at Stony Brook University and if I ever wanted to get home the LIRR was right down the road.

This is why I think this would be a good idea for this assignment, to go and photograph Stony Brook Village and the East Setauket area and show those who are unaware what this neighborhood has to offer, other than the local bar, The Bench.

The village is full of small eateries, shops and an 8 acre park. So I figured why not a listicle of about 15-20 places located in the backyard of Stony Brook University. Within each I can include facts about each location, if it is cheap and affordable for students, the history behind it and so on.

The listicle will range from shopping locations, places to eat and historical land marks, but mainly what is affordable. For example, a hole in the wall restaurant that is a bang for your buck, or how you can just walk around and enjoy the historical scenery for free.

This list would be relatable to college students because, as mentioned before, those who are not from Long Island do not know the area well. Also, it will give students affordable ideas to change things up for casual hangouts or even dates. Also, we will try and find a fun and interesting fact about every place we visit to make this more unique.

Due to the cold weather it probably wouldn’t be the most ideal but we are breaching Spring and this could be a nice venture to look forward to.

Photo Credit:  palspleinair.blogspot.com
Photo Credit:
palspleinair.blogspot.com