Telling a story with photos? Now that’s the spirit!

Long Island, while rich and abundant with culture and nature, also has its share of haunted locations with ghost stories and folklore galore.

Is there really life after death? Is a place really haunted or can these anomalies be scientifically debunked? What explanation is there for what seems abnormal in pictures or videos? From tales of someone murdered to the agonies of medical patients, the energies of those cling onto the environment, as some paranormal investigators said.

A few places on Long Island known to be haunted are Lake Ronkonkoma, with its tale of a female Native American raped and killed by white settlers, Sweet Hollow Road, with more than one tale of hauntings plaguing the streetlight-deficient road and Kings Park Psychiatric Center, with the disembodied patients still roaming the halls.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/robree/11692101485/in/photostream/player/
Credit: Flikcr.com

There are many more places deemed haunted, such as a windmill on the Stony Brook Southampton campus.

This would be a good opportunity for pictures. Aside from taking pictures of antiquated buildings and scenery, some which are beautiful, anomalies may appear. If, in this event, that happens, it could raise the question; what is that in the picture? Granted what looks like a ghost may be dust or light anomalies, but a ghost is still possible, opening a potential platform for debate (If this assignment included audio, EVPs would have been a great inclusion).

Forget about the whole “haunted” concept of some of these places. These places have history to them as well. Kings Park Psychiatric Center, for example, opened in 1885, but was recently closed in 1996. It should be mentioned that there used to be a railroad line diverging from the Port Jefferson branch line that served the center.

This assignment would provide adrenaline rushes, potential frights, adventure, historic education, and, but hopefully not, potential prosecution. But journalism is nothing without a few risks.

Feature photo: Kings Park Psychiatric Center, Building 93. Credit: Wikipedia

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